Wednesday, January 18, 2006

Starting with Oracle

I just read an interesting article on IT Toolbox Blogs about how to get started with an Oracle database career.

The article is not specific to DBA's, it applies to Developers too, in fact anybody that wants a career with Oracle databases.

At the moment it's very generalised, there are high level suggestions to read books and browse internet sites, without specific examples of which ones are good.

However, it's the first part in a series, so that kind of detail may come later, it will be interesting to see how it develops.

I posted a while back on what I thought Newbies needed to know and I still think that before you even attempt to log onto an Oracle database you have a good read of the concepts guide.

That is something that doesn't only apply to Oracle, if you want a career as a DBA or Developer then you need a good understanding of database concepts.

I received a phone call from a Newbie DBA friend of mine last week.
They were having difficulties as something had gone wrong with a test restore and they couldn't work out what the problem was.

To me, the problem was obvious, it also became clear to my friend when they suggested "I think the problem is that I don't fully understand what it is I'm trying to do".

We worked through the issue, and my final, polite suggestion was they now spend a couple of hours reading through the backup and recovery guide.

I know I found it really difficult at first, being told I was the new DBA and not really understanding what that meant or what I was supposed to do, but I found I was able to learn more quickly and understand how thing worked more easily once I had a good grasp of the concepts.

4 Comments:

Blogger shrek said...

the concepts guide is your friend.

BTW, nice picture.;-)

Wednesday, January 18, 2006 4:35:00 pm  
Blogger Danny R said...

So Tom Kyte isn't the only one to love the concepts guide! ;-)

I've skimmed it myself and found it really useful, also read the 2 day guides available for download as they are an excellent way to get started real fast.

Final Year Computing Student

Friday, January 20, 2006 11:17:00 am  
Blogger Jeff Moss said...

Your last word says it all really - guess that's why Oracle have a concepts manual and it's the one you should read once a year and whenever a new release appears.

Sunday, January 29, 2006 6:59:00 pm  
Anonymous Nigel Cemm said...

We also need to understand the expectations and attitudes of those who rely upon databases, whether they are aware or not that they do so.

Often the view is that databases "just work, don't they?". Afterall, with GUI tools, database design and administration is simply a point and click affair, isn't it?

Manuals are for wimps or for those who "want to reach perfection".

I am lucky in that I have an employer who has paid for worthwhile training in the five years that I have been a DBA. This has helped me in the transition from development to a mix of administration, design and consultancy.

Having said that, most of my knowledge has come from spending my own money and time learning my trade. Lunchtimes reading and re-reading the concepts manual. Countless hours during evenings and weekends working on my own, ensuring that my day job is done with *understanding*.

Spare a thought to those souls who are not as fortunate as ourselves, whose peers believe that some mouse waving at a pretty GUI tool is all that is required in order to implement robust and scalable applications that connect to well performing, secure and recoverable databases.

I suppose what I'm saying is, when someone becomes the "database guy", it is often the education of those who do not consider database administration, design or development to be of any worth, that is just as critical to the success of a system or project.

Apologies for such a long post.

I have only recently come across your Blog, Lisa, and I have found it a consistently good read, with your articles well written and thought provoking. Thank you.

Congratulations on gaining your BSc.

Monday, February 13, 2006 1:06:00 am  

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